Saturday, April 11, 2009

Overcoming the Five Hindrances

The following is taken from Nyanaponika Thera
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/authors/nyanaponika/wheel026.html

The Five Hindrances are the major psychological impediments to mindfulness (present center awareness) and the deepening of concentration into sublime states of consciousness.

The Five Hindrances are:
1. Sensual Desire/Attachment
2. Anger/Aversion
3. Restlessness
4. Dullness
5. Doubt

1. Overcoming Sensual Desire
Six things are conducive to the abandonment of sensual desire:
Learning how to meditate on impure objects;
Devoting oneself to the meditation on the impure;
Guarding the sense doors;
Moderation in eating;
Noble friendship;
Suitable conversation.

2. Overcoming Anger
Six things are helpful in conquering anger and aversion:
Learning how to meditate on loving-kindness;
Devoting oneself to the meditation of loving-kindness;
Considering that one is the owner and heir of one's actions (kamma);
Frequent reflection on it Cause and effect
Noble friendship;
Suitable conversation.

Also helpful in conquering ill-will are:
Rapture, of the factors of absorption (jhananga);
Faith, of the spiritual faculties (indriya);
Rapture and equanimity, of the factors of enlightenment (bojjhanga).

3. Overcoming Dullness
Six things are conducive to the abandonment of sloth and torpor:
Knowing that overeating is a cause of it;
Changing the bodily posture;
Thinking of the perception of light;
Staying in the open air;
Noble friendship;
Suitable conversation.

Also helpful in conquering sloth and torpor are:
The recollection of Death
 and impermanence.

4. Overcoming Restlessness
Six things are conducive to the abandonment of restlessness and remorse:
1. Knowledge of the Buddhist scriptures (Doctrine and Discipline);
2. Asking questions about them;
3. Familiarity with the Vinaya (the Code of Monastic Discipline, and for lay followers, with the principles of moral conduct);
4. Association with those mature in age and experience, who possess dignity, restraint and calm;
5. Noble friendship;
6. Suitable conversation.

Also helpful in conquering restlessness and remorse is:
Rapture, of the factors of absorption (jhananga);
Concentration, of the spiritual faculties (indriya);
Tranquillity, concentration and equanimity, of the factors of enlightenment (bojjhanga).

5. Overcoming Doubt
There are things which are wholesome or unwholesome, blameless or blameworthy, noble or low, and (other) contrasts of dark and bright; frequently giving wise attention to them — that is the denourishing of the arising of doubt that has not yet arisen, and of the increase and strengthening of doubt that has already arisen.
(note: the first three and the last two are identical with those given for restlessness and remorse. Only the fourth is different)

1. Knowledge of the Buddhist scriptures (Doctrine and Discipline);
2. Asking questions about them;
3. Familiarity with the Vinaya (the Code of Monastic Discipline, and for lay followers, with the principles of moral conduct);
4. Firm conviction concerning the Buddha, Dhamma and Sangha;
5. Noble friendship;
6. Suitable conversation.

Also helpful in conquering Doubt are:
Reflection, of the factors of absorption (jhananga);
Wisdom, of the spiritual faculties (indriya);
Investigation of reality, of the factors of enlightenment (bojjhanga).

1 comment:

  1. I have same interest like you, excellent post
    thank you dear friend, surely i visit you often

    kumar
    http://stress-coping.blogspot.com/

    ReplyDelete